Replace your bash terminal with zsh

The Mac or Linux shell can be replaced with zsh to open up a world of extra plugins, features and themes. And it’s a pretty nice UX/UI upgrade from bash tbh.

This post covers the installation and configuration required to set up a really nice zsh shell in your terminal. Your mileage may vary between different terminals, e.g. blackbox, gnome-terminal etc. Try opening different ones, once zsh is set up to see the differences, if any, and just stick with what works best for you.

Installation

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install zsh

chsh -s $(which zsh)

sh -c "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/ohmyzsh/ohmyzsh/master/tools/install.sh)"

mkdir -p ~/.local/share/fonts

cd ~/.local/share/fonts

curl -fLo "MesloLGS NF Regular.ttf" https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k-media/raw/master/MesloLGS%20NF%20Regular.ttf

curl -fLo "MesloLGS NF Bold.ttf" https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k-media/raw/master/MesloLGS%20NF%20Bold.ttf

curl -fLo "MesloLGS NF Italic.ttf" https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k-media/raw/master/MesloLGS%20NF%20Italic.ttf

curl -fLo "MesloLGS NF Bold Italic.ttf" https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k-media/raw/master/MesloLGS%20NF%20Bold%20Italic.ttf

fc-cache -fv

In your terminal of choice, replace the default font with "MesloLGS NF"

git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k.git ${ZSH_CUSTOM:-$HOME/.oh-my-zsh/custom}/themes/powerlevel10k

vi ~/.zshrc

Find and Edit the line: ZSH_THEME="powerlevel10k/powerlevel10k", save and exit vi.

source ~/.zshrc

Powerlevel10K Theme for Zsh

p10k has a number of customisable prompt elements. You will be prompted by a wizard upon first execution of the theme and it will run through various options/choices to create the .p10k.zsh config file sourced by your .zshrc file.

vi ~/.p10k.zsh and edit the left and right prompt elements contained in the following two sections.

typeset -g POWERLEVEL9K_LEFT_PROMPT_ELEMENTS=(
  os_icon
  dir
  vcs
  ...
)

typeset -g POWERLEVEL9K_RIGHT_PROMPT_ELEMENTS=(
  status
  command_execution_time
  background_jobs
  ...
)

After any changes, 

source ~/.p10k.zsh

Add syntax highlighting and auto suggestion

git clone https://github.com/zsh-users/zsh-autosuggestions ${ZSH_CUSTOM:-~/.oh-my-zsh/custom}/plugins/zsh-autosuggestions

git clone https://github.com/zsh-users/zsh-syntax-highlighting.git ${ZSH_CUSTOM:-~/.oh-my-zsh/custom}/plugins/zsh-syntax-highlighting

Autocorrection exemptions
If you make a mistake, zsh will offer a correction.  If you have certain commands or worlds that are repeatedly prompted with autocorrection options, you can add them to the exemption list in ~/.oh-my-zsh/lib/correction

Find and edit the load plugins line in ~/.zshrc
plugins=(git zsh-autosuggestions zsh-syntax-highlighting)

source ~/.zshrc



If you're happy everything works, replace your default shell in /etc/passwd for your user to /usr/bin/zsh

Prompt Elements

  1. os_icon: Operating system icon.
  2. dir: Current directory.
  3. vcs: Version control system (e.g., Git status).
  4. prompt_char: Prompt character.
  5. status: Exit status of the last command.
  6. command_execution_time: Duration of the last command.
  7. background_jobs: Indicator for background jobs.
  8. history: Command history number.
  9. time: Current time.
  10. date: Current date.
  11. battery: Battery status.
  12. user: Current user.
  13. hostname: Hostname of the machine.
  14. ip: IP address.
  15. load: System load.
  16. disk_usage: Disk usage.
  17. ram: RAM usage.
  18. swap: Swap usage.
  19. cpu: CPU usage.
  20. kubecontext: Kubernetes context.
  21. node_version: Node.js version.
  22. python_version: Python version.
  23. ruby_version: Ruby version.
  24. go_version: Go version.
  25. php_version: PHP version.
  26. java_version: Java version.
  27. aws: AWS profile.
  28. azure: Azure account.
  29. gcloud: Google Cloud account.
  30. terraform: Terraform workspace.
  31. nix_shell: Nix shell.
  32. context: Context (e.g., user@hostname).
Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Make your bash prompt look like Kali Linux’s

Running Kali as a daily driver is doable since it’s Debian Linux, but is it suitable or really necessary. No. Not really. You should have a dedicated laptop for running it and only run it to use the tools when ethical or approved to do so.

But there are some features in the Kali UX that you might want to see in your daily driver distro.

One of these features for me is the zsh prompt. I really like the Kali prompt but I use bash.

To make your Linux bash prompt look like the zsh one in Kali Linux, you need to customize the Bash prompt by modifying the .bashrc file in your home directory. The Kali Linux terminal prompt is typically configured to display the username, hostname, and current working directory with specific colors and formats. Here’s how you can achieve a similar look:

Open the Terminal:
Open your terminal on your Linux distribution.

Edit the .bashrc File:
Use a text editor to open the .bashrc file in your home directory. You can use nano, vim, or any other text editor you prefer. Here, we will use nano:

nano ~/.bashrc

Modify the PS1 Variable:
Find the line that defines the PS1 variable. It might look something like this:

PS1=’${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ ‘
Comment it out (never delete anything!) with a hash and replace it with the following configuration to mimic the Kali Linux prompt:

#PS1=’${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ ‘
PS1='[\033[01;32m]\u@\h[\033[00m]:[\033[01;34m]\w[\033[00m]\$ ‘

Another example I found on the web looks like this. Try it out.

PS1=”\033[38;5;209m]┌──[\033[38;5;141m]\u\033[38;5;209m]:\033[38;5;105m]\h\033[38;5;231m]\W\033[38;5;209m]]\n\033[38;5;209m]└─\[\033[38;5;209m]$[\033[37m] “

Finally, here’s one I made. Retain the original PS1 line you commented out, then try appending it to your .bashrc file.

PROMPT_COMMAND=’PS1_CMD1=$(ip route get 1.1.1.1 | awk -F”src ” ‘”‘”‘NR == 1{ split($2, a,” “);print a[1]}'”‘”‘)’; PS1=’\[\e[38;5;191;2m\]Exit status: \[\e[22;7m\]$?\[\e[0m\] \[\e[38;5;202;2m\]${PS1_CMD1}\n\[\e[0;38;5;64;53m\]\d \[\e[38;5;155;2m\]\t\[\e[0m\] \[\e[38;5;202;1;53m\]\u\[\e[22;2;2m\]@\[\e[22m\]\H\[\e[0m\] \n\[\e[38;5;46;2m\]\[\e[38;5;246;4;53m\]\w\[\e[0m\] \n\[\e[38;5;249m\]\$\[\e[0m\]’

Note: You can limit the number of components in the working directory path by setting the PROMPT_DIRTRIM environment variable in your ~/.bashrc file. This is worth doing if you work with exceptionally deep directory paths.

Here’s what each part of this configuration does:

[\033[01;32m]: Sets the color to green.
\u: Displays the username.
@: Adds the “@” character.
\h: Displays the hostname.
[\033[00m]: Resets the color.
:: Adds a colon character.
[\033[01;34m]: Sets the color to blue.
\w: Displays the current working directory.
[\033[00m]: Resets the color.
\$ : Adds the dollar sign for normal users or a hash for the root user, followed by a space.
Save the Changes:
Save the changes in nano by pressing Ctrl+O, then Enter, and exit by pressing Ctrl+X.

Apply the Changes:
To apply the changes you made to the .bashrc file, either close and reopen the terminal or source the .bashrc file:


source ~/.bashrc
After completing these steps, your terminal prompt should look similar to the one in Kali Linux, displaying the username, hostname, and current working directory with the specified colors.

This cool little website allows you to generate custom PS1 prompts for bash that contain just the elements you want. Alternatively, just install zsh and enjoy the additional features that come with it.

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Linux Digital Clock Format (strftime)

To display seconds on the Raspberry Pi OS digital clock, you need to modify the clock settings on the taskbar. Here are the steps to achieve that:

Raspberry Pi OS Digital Clock Settings
  1. Accessing the Clock Settings: a. Right-click on the clock at the top-right corner of the Raspberry Pi OS desktop. b. From the context menu, select ‘Digital Clock Settings’ or a similar option (the name might vary slightly based on the version of Raspberry Pi OS you’re using).
  2. Adjusting Clock Format: a. In the Digital Clock Settings window, find the field named ‘Clock Format’ or ‘Format’. b. This field determines how the time is displayed. You’ll typically see some format strings like %H:%M which stands for Hour:Minute in 24-hour format. c. To add seconds, modify the string to %H:%M:%S. The %S denotes seconds. d. Once done, click ‘OK’ or ‘Apply’ to save the changes.
  3. The digital clock on your taskbar should now display hours, minutes, and seconds.

Note: The format strings are based on the strftime function format. You can further customize the time and date format using various codes. If you’re interested, you can look up strftime format codes online for more details.

The strftime function in the C programming language provides a way to format time and date. It’s used in various systems and software, and many programming languages provide similar functionality based on the C’s strftime.

Here’s a list of common strftime codes:

  • %a : Abbreviated weekday name (e.g., Wed).
  • %A : Full weekday name (e.g., Wednesday).
  • %b : Abbreviated month name (e.g., Jan).
  • %B : Full month name (e.g., January).
  • %c : Locale’s appropriate date and time representation.
  • %C : Century (year divided by 100, range 00 to 99).
  • %d : Day of the month as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 01 to 31).
  • %D : Equivalent to %m/%d/%y (e.g., 04/08/21).
  • %e : Day of the month as a space-padded number (e.g., 1 to 31).
  • %F : Equivalent to %Y-%m-%d (e.g., 2021-04-08).
  • %H : Hour (24-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 00 to 23).
  • %I : Hour (12-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 01 to 12).
  • %j : Day of the year as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 001 to 366).
  • %m : Month as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 01 to 12).
  • %M : Minute as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 00 to 59).
  • %p : Locale’s equivalent of either AM or PM.
  • %r : Time in AM or PM notation (e.g., 08:08:08 PM).
  • %R : Equivalent to %H:%M.
  • %S : Second as a zero-padded decimal number (e.g., 00 to 59).
  • %T : Equivalent to %H:%M:%S.
  • %u : Weekday as a number, where Monday is 1 and Sunday is 7.
  • %U : Week number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a zero-padded decimal number.
  • %V : ISO 8601 week number of the year with Monday as the first day of the week.
  • %w : Weekday as a decimal number, where Sunday is 0 and Saturday is 6.
  • %W : Week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week).
  • %x : Locale’s appropriate date representation.
  • %X : Locale’s appropriate time representation.
  • %y : Last two digits of the year (e.g., 21 for 2021).
  • %Y : Full year (e.g., 2021).
  • %z : UTC offset in the form +HHMM or -HHMM.
  • %% : A literal % character.

You can combine these codes in various ways to create custom date and time formats. For example, %A, %B %d, %Y would produce “Wednesday, April 08, 2021”.

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Performance benchmarking with hashcat and sysbench

You can compare performance between linux systems using hashcat.

Install using sudo apt-get install hashcat

Run with hashcat -b

A series of cryptographic hashing algorithms are run and the resulting hashes/second reported.

Example output from LG Gram 17 laptop:

hashcat benchmark LG Gram 17

Example output from Raspberry Pi 4 Model B (8GB)

hashcat benchmark Raspberry Pi 4 Model B (8GB)

Before using sysbench, first you need to determine the number of CPU cores in your system.

Two ways to do this, either grep -c ^processor /proc/cpu or lscpu

Determine the number of CPU Cores

Then sysbench cpu –threads=4 run replacing 4 with the number of cores in your system, e.g. on Raspberry Pi 4 Model B…

sysbench cpu benchmark tool

On a LG Gram 17 laptop,

LG Gram 17 16 Cores
LG Gram 17
Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Working with QR Codes

Consider this a crash course in working with QR codes on Linux.

A QR code is an image that represents a URL. It can be quickly and conveniently scanned by the camera on a mobile device to open the link, rather than having to type it in manually.

The following packages will need to be installed.

sudo apt-get install qrencode zbarimg feh 

Creating a QR Code

qrencode -o "./cyberfella.png" "https://www.cyberfella.co.uk" 

Viewing a QR Code

feh ./cyberfella.png

Reading a QR Code

zbarimg ./cyberfella.png

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Installing Tailscale VPN client on Linux

Tailscale is a very slick, free VPN solution that places all your devices inside your home LAN, even when you’re out and about.

Each device is assigned an IPv4 address so you can communicate with all the devices and services in your home network from anywhere.

The client for Android is available in the Play Store.

The commands below get you up and running on your Linux Mint 20.3 and/or Ubuntu 20.4.5.

curl -fsSL https://pkgs.tailscale.com/stable/ubuntu/focal.noarmor.gpg | sudo tee /usr/share/keyrings/tailscale-archive-keyr
ing.gpg >/dev/null
curl -fsSL https://pkgs.tailscale.com/stable/ubuntu/focal.tailscale-keyring.list | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/tailsca
le.list
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install tailscale
sudo tailscale up
tailscale ip -4

Tailscale is free to use for personal use and is available in the Umbrel App Store, if you’re running your own Umbrel Bitcoin and Lightning Validator Node and want to connect your wallet to it from anywhere.

Once installed, log in here to see all your tailscale connected devices.

The Umbrel app store also contains Samourai Dojo Server so you can connect your Bitcoin Samourai wallet to your own Dojo Server and perform transactions privately using Bitcoin’s CoinJoin privacy feature.

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Fix Ledger Nano X USB connection issues on Linux

Ledger Nano X Review (2022) - Is the Ledger Nano X Safe?

ADD THE NECESSARY UDEV RULES

wget -q -O - https://raw.githubusercontent.com/LedgerHQ/udev-rules/master/add_udev_rules.sh | sudo bash

https://support.ledger.com/hc/en-us/articles/115005165269-Fix-USB-connection-issues-with-Ledger-Live?support=true

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Fan Speed Control on Dell XPS 15 running Linux

Add dell-smm-hwmon sensors to kernel modules

sudo su
echo "options dell-smm-hwmon restricted=0 force=1" > /etc/modprobe.d/dell-smm-hwmon.conf
echo "dell-smm-hwmon" > /etc/modules
exit
sudo update-initramfs -u

Reboot, and the fans should be visible with:

sensors
dell_smm-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
fan1: 0 RPM
fan2: 0 RPM

Control System i8kutils

Install i8kutils to take control of the fans.

sudo apt install i8kutils
sudo su
echo "i8k" > /etc/modules
echo "options i8k force=1" > /etc/modprobe.d/i8k.conf
exit

Reboot

sudo modprobe i8k force=1


Configure i8kutils

sudo vi /etc/i8kmon.conf

I left the config file at the defaults and the fans stayed under control as did the temps. check the temps and fan speeds at any time with the sensors command

sensors
45 – 50 degrees C and 2500 RPM fan speeds whilst running Brave and Virtual Box
Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Enabling Snaps in Linux Mint 20+

Linux MInt has taken the decision to disable the ability to install snapd and subsequently containerised apps (or snaps) from the Ubuntu Snap Store.

Linux Mint users are met with an error when attempting to install snapd or snap store applications

You can disable the block on installing snapd as follows.

sudo rm /etc/apt/preferences.d/nosnap.pref
sudo apt update
sudo apt install snapd

This will allow you to install those specific containerised versions of apps that you want, e.g. Whatsdesk (a containerised Whatsapp client for your Linux desktop).

sudo snap install whatsdesk
Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash:

Expand the existing Swapfile on Linux

Note that this only applies if you’re using a swapfile as opposed to a swap partition. This will apply if you’re using full disk encryption since the swap file is then also encrypted. Most modern linux distro’s will behave in this way by default.

Ignore the first dd command since it contains a typo (shown)

If you’re using KDE Plasma as your desktop environment, for entertainment purposes, open Memory.

The Memory Information dialog opens to look like this.

Now expand the window by dragging a corner and you’ll see some neat graphs of memory usage…

Memory and Swap Usage graphs in KDE Plasma Desktop Environments “Memory” app

Now with your Konsole to one side of the graphs, observe the changes going on on the system as you execute each command. Really quite cool. KDE Plasma is great. By far my favourite desktop environment. I recommend it but live in it for a week and figure it all out since it’s quite comprehensive. You’ll likely not go back!

Did you like this?
Tip cyberfella with Cryptocurrency

Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some bitcoin:

Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Bitcoin Cash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send bitcoin:

Donate Ethereum to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Ethereum to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Ether:

Donate Litecoin to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Litecoin to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Litecoin:

Donate Monero to cyberfella

Scan to Donate Monero to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some Monero:

Donate ZCash to cyberfella

Scan to Donate ZCash to cyberfella
Scan the QR code or copy the address below into your wallet to send some ZCash: